Sun, April 20, 2014
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Department of Physics
The University of Winnipeg
515 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Canada. R3B 2E9

Phone: (204) 786-9852

More Contact Information...

 



Dr. Jeff Martin

Dr. Jeff Martin

Professor of Physics

Ph. D. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2000)

Phone: (204)786-9443
Fax: (204)774-4134
U of W office: 3L22

E-Mail:
Web Site: http://subatomic.uwinnipeg.ca (a new browser window will open)

COURSES (2013-2014):
  • PHYS-4303 - Subatomic Physics (Winter 2014)

RESEARCH INTERESTS:

In nature, four fundamental forces exist: gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. The weak force is the only force which does not look the same when viewed in a mirror. The violation of mirror symmetry is called "parity violation". The weak and electromagnetic forces have been combined together (or "unified") in electroweak theory. The strong force has been unified with electroweak theory in what is known as the standard model of particle physics. Precise measurements of parity violation at low energies yield information on the weak force. This might inform us of physics beyond the standard model, and might even shed light on how to unify all the forces into one theory. It is the goal of my research to perform low-energy measurements of parity violation in order to possibly make new discoveries of physics beyond the standard model. A second goal is to use the weak force to study the strong force, in particular to study how the strong force between quarks in protons and neutrons contributes to their structure.


RECENT PUBLICATIONS:

See SPIRES listing for recent publications.

UWinnipeg Physics